June 1998 – “Class of 1998”

Albuquerque academy 1998 high school graduation
On the Academy campus

On the Academy campus

These are a few reproductions of 35 millimeter (mm) slides that were taken of the June, 1998, graduation ceremony for the Albuquerque Academy graduating class of 1998.  Included also are photographs of some of the buildings taken on the same day as the graduation event.  The Albuquerque Academy is located at 6400 Wyoming Boulevard NE, in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

the albuquerque academy campus
School arches

School arches

The campus is rather large.  It includes open, natural fields where jack rabbits play, carefully cultivated athletic fields for almost every sport, large grassy areas for solitude and relaxation, and a wide variety of buildings for almost every academic purpose.  The school is a wonder to behold.

Pictures of the campus and graduation
The graduation tent

The graduation tent

In the following pictures you will see the tents setup for the graduation ceremony on the field indicated HERE.  There are also a few personal pictures of the author of this website, of his wife and of his son Storey Clayton, “class of 1998.”  Click on the thumbnail pictures to enlarge.  One may also click on the larger images to enlarge further.  Click again (if you wish) if there is a ‘+’ on your cursor when it is over a photo.

The tent gets larger as one gets closer

The tent gets larger as one gets closer

The graduation tent entrance

The graduation tent entrance

After the graduation ceremony refreshments are served

After the graduation ceremony refreshments are served

Storey Clayton with his mother in June of 1998

Storey Clayton with his mother in June of 1998

Storey Clayton with his father in June of 1998

Storey Clayton with his father in June of 1998

more photographs may be coming

If you return to this page at some date in the future there very well be more photographs added.  This page represents an experiment in the reproduction of 35 mm color slides.  Let the experiment begin.

the projection-digitalization experiment

These 35 mm Kodak slides were taken and developed (by Kodak) in 1988.  They were not scanned by any digital scanner, neither a retail scanner nor a commercial scanning operation.  The slides were projected using a Carousel 5200 projector onto a Da-Lite screen in a substantially darkened (but not totally darkened) room.  The screen image was manually photographed with an early model Sony digital camera with a built-in ‘close-up’ adjustable lens.  No tripod was used.  No flash was used.

The resulting images were fairly aggressively adjusted and modified using an Apple computer standard iPhoto program.  The image quality might be significantly improved by: (1) a darker room, (2) a tripod, (3) a remote control shutter release, (4) a higher resolution setting on the camera, (5) a better camera, a newer camera, (6) being scanned commercially.

The great advantage of projection-digitalization is that it is far easier and far faster than using any retail slide-capable scanner sold.  When one has 5,000 to 10,000 ‘old family slides’ to potentially scan, the time and effort it takes is certainly a consideration.  In Albuquerque there are “local guys” that can scan slides.  They charge 39 cents to $1.25 per picture to do so, depending on the quality and detail desired.  Other less expensive options involve ones slides being shipped overseas or to locations outside New Mexico.  There is always a danger of loss, and a danger in the slide images being ‘adjusted’ in a way that one isn’t prepared for.  The ‘deep saturations’ characteristic of older (1950’s) color slides can be lost by factory adjustment to ‘natural color’.

In my case, the first efforts at projection-digitalization were confounded by the lack of a new bulb for the projector.  The ‘old one’ worked, but it seemed a bit dim.  The new projector bulbs are brighter than the original bulbs ever were.  One should always buy a new bulb.  Obviously clean the projector lens and make sure it isn’t noticeably scratched.

When all is said and done it is obvious that hiring someone to scan ones’ slides has value, depending upon ones resources and the value of ones time.  At the above mentioned prices a budget of $2,000 for a camera and an almost perfect setup would not be unreasonable.  A very nice camera and/or the appropriate lenses can be purchased for much less, and after it is all over (and during) one has a very nice camera to own and to use.  It all is dependent upon ones time, interests, resources and health.